What is Flatulence? How to Get Rid of It?

Is flatulence normal?

The average adult has flatulence between 13 and 21 times a day. Flatulence is a normal part of the digestion process. But if flatulence builds up in your intestines and you’re unable to expel it, you may start to feel pain and discomfort.

Gas pain, bloating, and flatus frequency can be exacerbated by anything that causes diarrhea or constipation. Flatulence can also be caused by:

  • overeating
  • swallowing air while you eat or drink
  • gum chewing
  • smoking cigarettes
  • eating certain foods

Make an appointment with your doctor if your flatulence symptoms:

  • cause you distress
  • change suddenly
  • are accompanied with constipation, diarrhea, or weight loss

Your doctor can determine the underlying cause.

How to get rid of flatulence?

Often, your flatulence is caused by what you eat. Food is digested primarily in your small intestine. What is left undigested is fermented in your colon with bacteria, fungi, and yeast, as part of digestion. This process produces methane and hydrogen, which are expelled as flatus.

For many people, changing dietary habits is enough to alleviate flatulence and its accompanying symptoms. One way to determine which foods are giving you flatulence is by keeping a food diary. Common culprits include:

  • high-fiber food
  • foods with high fat content
  • fried or spicy food
  • carbonated beverages
  • artificial ingredients commonly found in low-carbohydrate and sugar-free products, such as sugar alcohol, sorbitol, and maltitol
  • beans and lentils
  • cruciferous vegetables, such as Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, and broccoli
  • prunes or prune juice
  • foods containing lactose, such as milk, cheese, and other dairy products
  • fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols (FODMAP) — molecules found in a wide range of foods, such as garlic and onion, that may be hard to digest
  • over-the-counter fiber drinks and supplements

When Should You See Your Doctor?

If your flatulence and bloating concern you, discuss these symptoms with your doctor. She will check your history and symptoms to see if they point towards a health condition that can cause excessive flatulence. Many of these are treatable.

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Products for Pancreatitis Treatment

What is pancreatitis?

Pancreatitis is an inflammatory condition that occurs within the pancreas, a large and important organ located behind the stomach and connected to the first part of the small intestine known as the duodenum.

The pancreas has two main functions: supplying enzymes that help to digest proteins, carbohydrates and fats in the small intestine, and secreting hormones that regulate the body’s metabolism of sugar. Under normal circumstances, the pancreatic enzymes that digest food become activated when they leave the pancreas and reach the duodenum; however, under abnormal circumstances such as pancreatitis they can become activated inside the pancreas and start “digesting” the gland itself, causing tissue injury and inflammation.

What are pancreatitis symptoms?

The most common pancreatitis symptom is abdominal pain, occurring either in discrete episodes that last hours to days, or continuously for months or even years.

Acute pancreatitis comes on suddenly, usually with mild to severe pain in the upper abdomen that may radiate to the back and occasionally to the chest.

A number of complications can occur from severe or repeated bouts of pancreatitis. As pancreatic tissue is damaged, it becomes more susceptible to bacterial infection by organisms that originate in the small intestine and spread into ducts or the pancreas itself. This can lead to high fevers, abscess formation, septic shock and ultimately organ failure if the infection is not contained or controlled in time.

Recovering through your diet

If you’ve suffered an acute pancreatitis episode, you can help speed your recovery with some dietary and lifestyle changes, she says.

Try these tips:

  • Eat 6 to 8 small meals a day. It’s easier on your pancreas.
  • Add 1 to 2 tablespoons of MCTs to your daily diet and you can continue this if you have moderately severe or severe chronic pancreatitis.
  • Take a multivitamin to replenish vitamins A, D, E, K, B12, zinc and folic acid.
  • Limit total fat intake to less than 30 grams per day. Eliminate saturated fats.
  • Avoid alcohol.
  • Don’t smoke (or do your best to quit).
  • Stay hydrated.
  • If your abdominal pain continues, your doctor may also refer you to a pain management specialist.

Natural Treatment of Pancreatitis

Especially in the case of chronic pancreatitis, natural products for pancreatitis treatment offer an excellent treatment option because they are capable of dealing with pancreatitis. If you consider these remedies, you may want to discuss it with your doctor first about how to cure pancreatitis with the help of natural products for pancreatitis treatment.

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Are there Alternative Medications for Gastritis Treatment?

Gastritis is inflammation (irritation) of the stomach lining. This may be caused by many factors including infection, alcohol, particular medications and some allergic and immune conditions. Gastritis can be either acute (with severe attacks lasting a day or two) or chronic (with long-term appetite loss or nausea). In many cases, gastritis has no symptoms (asymptomatic).

Some forms, including chronic atrophic gastritis, have been associated with an increased risk of stomach cancer. Treatment options include avoiding exposure to known irritants and taking medication to reduce the amount of gastric juices.

While there are instances where medical treatment is necessary to treat gastritis, many people find they can manage the symptoms at home. People with gastritis should see a doctor if they experience:

  • a gastritis flare-up that lasts more than a week
  • vomiting blood
  • blood in the stool

However, outside of medication, the four main causes of gastritis can all be remedied to some extent by changing your diet. Gastritis is the weakening of the stomach lining, and can sometimes be cured by a lifestyle change. Symptoms for gastritis can range from none at all to abdominal pain, indigestion, nausea, and even anemia. A diet change for gastritis focuses on alleviating the common causes of gastritis, and can be an effective gastritis treatment.

Finally, some people also choose to take over-the-counter drugs, such as antacids, to control severe symptoms, while others are prescribed proton pump inhibitors or H2 blockers to help control levels of stomach acid. In the cases where chronic gastritis causes anemia, it’s common for vitamin B12 deficiency to be treated using intermittent injections.

Research shows that foods that can help manage gastritis symptoms include high-antioxidant foods (especially those with flavonoids, like berries), onions, garlic, squash, bell peppers, nuts, soaked legumes/beans, sprouted whole grains, sea vegetables, and grass-fed meat or pasture-raised poultry. Supplements like omega-3 fatty acids, probiotics and vitamin C can also be beneficial for gastritis sufferers.

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Gastric Bands

FDA has approved two gastric bands: Lap-Band, by Allergan Inc., and Realize Adjustable Gastric Band, by Ethicon Endo-Surgery Inc. These devices are implanted around the upper part of the stomach to create a “pouch.” The small pouch limits the amount of food that can be eaten at one time, making you feel full faster and potentially lose weight.

Both bands are approved for use in adults age 18 and older who have not lost weight with non-surgical methods, such as diet, exercise or behavior modification, and have a BMI of at least 35 (217 pounds at 5-foot-6 inches) and at least one health condition linked to obesity, such as diabetes or high blood pressure.

Allergan’s Lap-Band is also approved for those with a BMI of 30 to 34 who have a health condition related to their obesity.

The Risks

“Surgery itself has risks, including death, and those risks are heightened for people who are obese,” says Herbert Lerner, M.D., a general surgeon and supervisory medical officer at FDA.

There are risks after the surgery, too, including

  • nausea and vomiting
  • difficulty swallowing
  • gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)
  • upset stomach or pain
  • stretching of the stomach pouch
  • stretching of the esophagus
  • moving of the gastric band, requiring another surgery to reposition it
  • erosion of the band through the stomach wall and into the stomach, requiring another surger