Watch Out for Products Which Claim to Cure Cancer

Scour the internet or social media sites and you will be sure to find some products that claim to cure cancer. Nicole Kornspan, M.P.H., a consumer safety officer at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), believes that the number of such products is very much on the rise.

Kornspan believes that these new products continue to sell because they play on the fears of people who are dealing with cancer personally, or helping a friend or family member suffering from the disease.

In order for a cancer-treating drug or device to be deemed legitimate, it must first receive approval or clearance from the FDA before going to market. The FDA goes to great lengths to ensure that products are safe and effective before being released to the general public,

There are plenty of products that slip through the cracks, though, which is why the internet is teeming with capsules, powders, pills, teas, creams, oils, and treatment kits, all of which claim to be the cure for cancer.

Manufacturers of these products as natural treatments, whilst also claiming that they are dietary supplements. These methods are used to make it seem as though the products are safe, but all that really happens is that cancer patients avoid legitimate treatment in favor of a “miracle cure.”

A product that does not have FDA approval may be one that contains unsafe ingredients.

Not only are humans at risk, pets are, too, as manufacturers target both. Kornspan says that there are a growing number of products out there that are sold as effective cancer treatments for cats and dogs. Vet bills can be expensive, which is why so many pet owners are drawn to the cheaper, albeit bogus, alternatives.

The FDA recommended that people steer clear of products not approved by them. They also advise that you should talk to a licensed health care professional about treatment options.

Red Flags to Watch out For

The one thing that most bogus products have in common is that they all use a specific vocabulary. Kornspan says that consumers should be on the lookout for the following phrases, which should be regarded as red flags:

  • Treats all forms of cancer
  • Miraculously kills cancer cells and tumors
  • Shrinks malignant tumors
  • Selectively kills cancer cells
  • More effective than chemotherapy
  • Attacks cancer cells, leaving healthy cells intact
  • Cures cancer

It is very often those statements, a well as a few others, that clearly show that a supposed cancer-curing drug is in fact fraudulent.

This is not to say that there are not investigational cancer treatments out there, but patients should talk to their doctor about the options as opposed to hitting the internet in search of a cure.


 

Advertisements

Anemia Supplements

Anemia is the most common blood disorder in the country. According to the Mayo Clinic, more than 3.4 million Americans suffer with some form of anemia, the symptoms of which often include fatigue, weakness, shortness of breath, pale skin, and cold or numb hands and feet. Headaches are another symptom, as are nails that break easily.

The goal anemia treatment is to increase the amount of oxygen that your blood can carry. This is done by raising the red blood cell count and/or hemoglobin level. Otherwise, doctors treat the underlying cause of the anemia.

Low levels of vitamins or iron in the body can cause some types of anemia. These low levels might be the result of a poor diet or certain diseases or conditions. To raise your vitamin or iron level, your doctor may ask you to change your diet or take vitamin or anemia supplements.

If you are indeed iron deficient, your doctor will probably prescribe iron supplements. Most people with mild or moderate iron deficiency anemia can correct the problem over a period of about three months, but if iron stores remain low, a few more months of supplementation may be recommended.

Strict vegetarians may need to take in higher levels of iron.

At high doses, iron is toxic. For adults and children ages 14 and up, the upper limit — the highest dose that can be taken safely — is 45 mg a day. Children under age 14 should not take more than 40 mg a day.

The American Academy of Pediatrics suggests that — starting at 4 months of age — full-term, breastfed infants should be supplemented with 1 mg/kg per day of oral iron. This should continue until iron-containing complementary foods, such as iron-fortified cereals, are introduced in the diet. Standard infant formula that contains 12 mg/L iron can fulfill the iron needs of an infant until age 1.

Sources:

Approved by the FDA or Not? Part 4

Infant Formula is not Approved by the FDA

Infant formulas do not require FDA approval before going to market. That said, formula manufacturers are subject to regulatory oversight from the agency.

Federal nutrient requirements need to be adhered to when the formula is being made. Manufacturers looking to bring a new product to market must first register with the FDA and provide notification of intent.

Manufacturers facilities are inspected by the FDA on a yearly basis, during which time samples of the infant formula are collected for testing. If these tests show that the formula presents any type of health risk, the manufacturer will be asked to conduct a recall.

Dietary Supplements are Not Approved by the FDA

While new drugs need to be approved by the FDA before going to market, the same is not the case with dietary supplements. The exception here is if the product includes a new dietary ingredient, which would be one that has not been marketed in the U.S. prior to October 15, 1994. Manufacturers using such an ingredient must notify the FDA 75 days prior to marketing.

When the manufacturer submits the notification information to the FDA, they must deliver a conclusion that shows that their dietary supplement is safe. If a health concern arises after a new product hits the market, the FDA will use research and event monitoring to better evaluate the safety of the dietary supplement.

Food Labels, Which Include the Nutrition Facts Panel, are Not Approved by the FDA

Individual food labels are not approved by the FDA before food products hit the market. That said, food manufacturers are required to show nutrition information on foods, as well as dietary supplements. When manufacturers make claims about their products, they cannot include false or misleading information.

The Nutrition Facts panel on a food label must show the serving size of the food, as well as the nutrient content. With dietary supplements, that information is usually shown on the Supplement Facts panel.

The FDA Does Not Approve Structure-Function Claims Found with Foods and Dietary Supplements

Foods or food components that are made to affect the structure or function of the human body will have structure-function claims that describe their role. “Calcium building stronger bones” is an example of such a claim.

Manufacturers of dietary supplements who create products with structure-function claims on their labels are required to submit a notification to the FDA. This notification needs to be submitted to the agency no later than 30 days after the product has gone to market. Items that need to be included in the notification are things such as the text of the claim, the notifier’s name and address, and other relevant information. The structure-function claims made on dietary supplement come with a disclaimer which makes it clear that the product has not been granted approval by the FDA, and that it is not intended as a treatment, cure, or diagnosis of any disease.

Conventional food manufacturers do not need to notify the FDA, nor do they need to carry a disclaimer, about structure-function claims.


 

The Dangers of Using Dietary Supplements and Nonprescription Drugs

You have to be careful when purchasing dietary supplements from flea markets, swap meets, online, ethnic stores and international stores because some of these products are nothing more than health fraud scams. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) representative Cariny Nunez (Public Health Advisory in the Office of Minority Health) warns us that health scams tend to lurk in nontraditional shopping locations and are highly attractive to non-English native speakers and people in remote locations where health care facilities and information are few in number or nonexistent.

“Natural” Does Not Automatically Equal “Safe”

According to FDA representative Dr. Gary Coody (National Health Fraud Coordinator), products marketed as natural are not always safe. Some products marketed as natural can contain other medical ingredients that are not only unnatural, but they are also unsafe to consume.

Also, harmful (and often unlisted) chemical ingredients and contamination may also be present in these products.

For instance, a substance in the FDA-approved drug Meridia called Sibutramine may still be present in some of these natural weight loss products. The problem with this is Sibutramine caused Meridia to be banned in 2010 because of the potential for the chemical to cause strokes and heart conditions.

Coody also warns us that FDA-approved ingredients can prove to be still unsafe if the prescription dosage or ingredient portion is in unsafe proportions.  As Nunez already mentioned, health scams tend to target nontraditional populations like ethnic societies and people with persistent health issues like obesity, cancer, heart disease and HIV/AIDS because these populations are often seeking more affordable and convenient ways to treat their conditions.  However, when people in these populations use these questionable products, they often experience a setback in real medical treatment for their conditions.

How Can You Determine if a Marketed Health Product is a Potential Scam?

Be alert for claims like these:

  • FDA-Approved. There are no imported or domestic or imported dietary supplements that are FDA-approved.
  • “All natural.” As stated earlier, some natural products have other additives that are unsafe to consume. Also, not all plants are safe to consume even if they are found in a supplement.
  • Quick fixes. There just aren’t any products out there that can treat a serious illness or condition quickly—no matter if it’s FDA-approved or not. So anything promising drastic results for a condition like obesity or cancer in a short period of time (like days or weeks) should be treated with extreme caution.
  • Personal testimonials. Just because someone says the product works doesn’t mean you should ignore the fact there is no scientific verification of these claims.
  • Miracle cure. Buzz words like “scientific breakthrough” or “new discovery” are often signs of an exaggerated claim. Our common sense should tell us that if this supplement provided the real cure for a serious condition, the media would already have this supplement featured on the radio, TV, internet or print publications.
  • One product does all. Always be cautious about products claiming to cure a host of health conditions.

Finally, consult your physician if you are still considering a drug that has questionable claims or is not FDA-approved. To determine if a product is already banned by the FDA, just go to their website to see if there are any existing legal issues concerning the product.

‘All Natural’ Alternatives for Erectile Dysfunction

Beware of products (like foods or dietary supplements) claiming to improve your sexual performance because a lot of these products contain hidden ingredients that are not fit for human consumption and have the potential to be unsafe.

According to the FDA, about 300 of the products out there on the market for sexual performance have been found to have ingredients not reported on the label. These products may include ingredients found in FDA-approved drugs like Levitra, Viagra and Cialis, but the amount may be extremely high (especially in dosage quantity). Also, some products have a combination of hidden ingredients that may prove to be very unsafe regardless of the amount found.

Dr. M. Daniel Dos Santos, representative of the Division of Dietary Supplement Programs for the FDA, tells us that even if you read labels to determine the safety of a product, you may still select a product that is unsafe because some of the ingredients may not be listed. Despite a product label boasting of having only natural or herbal ingredients, the product could still contain unnatural herbal ingredients and chemicals, which means the label is deceiving people into believing they have a natural product when in actuality, they do not.

A Drug Cocktail

The FDA has discovered there are a lot of high doses of hidden ingredient mixtures in a lot of supplements sold for Erectile Dysfunction (ED). One supplement had a dosage amount that contained 31 times more of the ingredient Tadalafil than what is contained in Cialis. Also, this supplement had a high amount of a non-FDA-approved antidepressant called Dapoxetine.

A lot of dietary supplements are legitimately marketed and are not approved by the FDA like many other prescription and non-prescription drugs. The FDA usually examines dietary supplement that are legally sold by either doing facility inspections or by responding to consumer reports of negative responses to using the product. It is required for a company to ensure the products they market for human consumption are safe and actually work.

Unknown Contaminants

Alternative ED products are often marketed as sexual enhancement supplements because a dietary supplement can’t claim legally that it will diagnose, prevent, treat or cure an actual medical condition. Even though they are legally available for sale, it does not guarantee they are safe.

Risky Interactions

Many of these sexual enhancement supplements for men create adverse interactions with heart medications and certain other drugs.

For instance, if you use a supplement that has Sildenafil (an ingredient found in Viagra) and also take drugs with Nitrates, you could risk your blood pressure dropping at an unsafe level. Keep in mind that a lot of people with ED often have conditions that require medications with Nitrates (like high blood pressure, diabetes and heart disease).

The FDA works hard to prevent the sale of unapproved products by issuing recalls and having these types of medicines destroyed. The organization also sends out several warnings to be cautious about these types of products. Advisory letters are often given to manufacturers that market these products to cease production and/or sale of these products. After the advisory is given, a refusal to stop marketing the illegal product could result in import alerts (where the FDA can seize and physically examine all products deemed to be in violation of the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act), seizures, recalls, injunctions and criminal prosecutions.

Nutritional Supplements for Sports Performance

Whether you’re an amateur athlete or a weekend warrior, there are nutritional supplements for improved sports performance can help you get the most out of every workout, game, or run!

Your preference for athletics may be a few hours playing tennis or pick-up soccer games, an afternoon hike, a mud run, or even some home training. You may not be a professional athlete, but that doesn’t mean you don’t take physical fitness seriously. And that means you probably want to improve your performance, regardless of how it’s measured.

The sad truth is, most supplements don’t live up to their marketing hype. And no supplement can replace a sensible diet or hard training. But a handful of these products do provide real, scientifically proven benefits for athletes, such as faster post-exercise recovery, enhanced workout performance and reduced risk of injury.

Nutritional supplements for sports performance are suitable for:

  • Athletes of all levels from recreational to professional.
  • Those looking to enhance endurance and stamina levels.
  • Anyone seeking to gain a competitive edge in their training and on match-day.

Sources:

Treatment for Tourette Syndrome

Tourette syndrome is a problem with the nervous system that causes people to make sudden movements or sounds, called tics, that they can’t control. For example, someone with Tourette’s might blink or clear their throat over and over again. Some people may blurt out words they don’t intend to say.

Treatments can control tics, but some people don’t need any unless their symptoms really bother them.

Tourette Syndrome has been linked to different parts of the brain, including an area called the basal ganglia, which helps control body movements. Differences there may affect nerve cells and the chemicals that carry messages between them. Researchers think the trouble in this brain network may play a role in Tourette’s. Doctors don’t know exactly what causes these problems in the brain, but genes probably play a role. It’s likely that there is more than one cause.

Dietary changes as well as certain supplements can be used to treat the condition. Eliminating trigger foods and ingredients as well as natural treatment for Tourette syndrome can nearly eliminate the presence of tics and other symptoms of the condition.

Source: http://www.yourwebdoc.com/nervoustics.php