Injectable products are becoming a popular alternative for those desiring to alter their skin color for the purpose of lightening or whitening their complexion. Despite the popularity of these products, they have yet to be FDA-approved (Food and Drug Administration) and are considered to be unsafe for use. These products are also believed to not have a significant effect on altering skin color.

One FDA representative noted that injectables contain mystery substances that may be extremely harmful to one’s body. Also, because no one knows how these injectables are made, it adds to the uncertainty of their safety.

A Costly Promises

Like most skin brightening and whitening products on the market, injectables promise to even skin tone, remove blemishes and lighten skin tone. You can find these products online and in some retail and health stores. Most products come with instructions on how to inject the product under the skin, in a vein or in a muscle. However, most people fail to realize that while these products are being marketed, they are not approved as safe by the FDA. Some injectable products claim to treat conditions like Parkinson’s or liver disease, which is also not able to be proved or verified by the FDA. Because it is not known how these products are made, no one can vouch for the safety of these products.

What Consumers Should Do

If you are having adverse reactions to using an injectable product in the past, contact your health care provider immediately.

Also, contact your health care provider if you want to try a safer way to deal with your skin problems (like melisma or hyperpigmentation). That way, you can use a topical product that is known to be approved by the FDA.

Unlike the injectable products for skin condition, FDA-approved drugs are verified to be safe and effective in doing their intended purpose. Also, if a product is FDA-approved, the manufacturer has also meet specific qualifications that verify the product was produced in a safe way.

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Winter and fall seem to be the most vulnerable times for getting contagious viruses because we tend to share more indoor time with other people when the weather starts cooling down.

However, there are plenty of FDA-approved medicines and vaccines you can take to combat these ailments.

Colds and Flu

A lot of respiratory infections go away as soon as they surface—often within a matter of a couple of days. There are some that are more lasting and can create serious health issues. Tobacco users and people who are around secondhand smoke often are more likely to experience respiratory infections and more serious complications than nonsmokers and nontobacco users.

Colds typically cause a runny or stuffy nose and sneezing. Sometimes, other symptoms are present like watery eyes, coughing and a scratchy throat. These are often spread through infected mucus and often gradually occur. To date, there is no vaccine available that combats a cold.

The Flu arrives suddenly and lasts a longer time than colds do. Signs of the flu are chills, fever, headache, body aches, dry cough, tiredness and overall discomfort. You can also have cold symptoms like runny or stuffy nose, watery eyes and sneezing. Some children have nausea and vomiting with the flu. This virus is contagious and spreads from droplets that occur when people with the flu talk, sneeze or cough. Touching a surface that has the flu virus can also cause you to catch the flu.

The time between the months of October and May is considered the Flu season in the United States with peaks time between December and February. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that:

  • Every year over 200,000 Americans experience hospital-related episodes from the flu (20,000 of these are children under age 5).
  • Between the 2014-15 flu season, 40 million flu-related conditions occurred. There were about 19 million flu-related healthcare visits and 970,000 flu-related hospitalizations, which was a record high for one flu season.
  • Between 1976 and 2006, there were between 3,000 to 49,000 deaths reported that related to the flu.

Prevention Tips

Get vaccinated against flu.

People ages 6 months and older should get the flu vaccine in nasal spray or shot form to decrease the need to be out of work and school because of the symptoms of the flu. The vaccine may also prevent hospitalizations and deaths from this virus.

It’s best to get vaccinated each year in the month of October, but it can still provide some relief if taken in January and afterwards. The reason why the vaccine has to be taken every year is because the virus mutates frequently and the protection from the previous year’s vaccine starts to decrease in effectiveness. If you are prone to other complication from having the flu, then it is highly recommended you take the vaccine every year.

People at high risk for the flu are:

  • Women who are pregnant
  • Children under 5 years old (especially those under 2)
  • People 6People 65 and up
  • People with certain chronic health conditions (such as asthma, diabetes, or heart and lung disease).

If you work in the health profession or live with/care for people with weak immune systems or are over 65 years old, then it is extremely important you get vaccinated.  Pregnant mothers are advised to get the flu vaccine while pregnant so their baby can stay protected up to six months after birth. Also, make sure people who come in contact with the baby are also current with their vaccinations.

Located at the top of each kidney, the adrenal glands produce hormones that help the body control blood sugar, burn protein and fat, react to stressors like a major illness or injury, and regulate blood pressure.

Adrenal gland health is important for overall human health. Adrenal gland diseases occur when the adrenal glands don’t make enough hormones. Symptoms include fatigue, muscle weakness, decreased appetite, and weight loss. Some people experience nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The good news is that the conditions caused by overproduction or underproduction of adrenal hormones are usually treatable.

What to eat to support adrenal gland health?

  • Eat fresh, whole foods – preferably organic, locally grown, seasonal food – for meals and snacks.
  • Avoid preservatives, added hormones, artificial colors, dyes, and chemicals.
  • Include lean protein with each meal and snack to help stabilize blood sugar and stave off cravings for refined sugars and caffeine.
  • If you buy prepared food, try to buy it at a health food store or grocery offering natural, whole foods.
  • Try to prepare extra nutritious snacks to have on hand so they are ready and available when you are having cravings.

Beverages also make a difference in supporting adrenal health. If you are used to choosing adrenal draining liquids like alcohol, sports drinks, or caffeinated drinks, this handy chart can show you some alternatives.

Adrenal gland diseases can be treated with natural treatment options. Read more about adrenal disorders and treatment in source page: www.yourwebdoc.com/adrenalglands.php

Five Tips for New Mothers

September 2, 2017

Mother’s Day is a great day for moms but can be a nightmare for new moms who are just learning how to take care of their new baby.

Your child’s pediatrician is a good source of information when it comes to getting insight on what to expect during childhood and adolescence concerning raising your children.

1. Consult Your Doctor Prior to Giving Your Baby any Medications

Always consult your doctor to ensure a medication you give your baby is suitable for children their age. If your doctor recommends using a medication, always make sure you get information on the right amount to give to a baby.

2. If breastfeeding, Consult Your Doctor Prior to using a New Medication

You should always let your doctor know you plan to breastfeed (or are breastfeeding) before taking any medication just to make sure it’s okay to use that medication. That also goes for any vitamin or herbal supplements and anything else you can get over-the-counter. Some medications pass through your breast milk and may not be safe for the baby to consume. You also have to consider if it’s good for your health to stop a medication, which may determine if you are able to breastfeed if chronic health problems dictate you need to remain on a certain medication.

3. Use the Proper Tools to give Your Baby Medicine

When administering medicine to your baby, use the right dosing device that came with the medication. If the medicine does not already have an oral syringe, then you can always get one at a local pharmacy without a prescription. Make sure the dose you give your baby is measured exactly as it reads with the dosing device.

4. Store Medications Safely

Never keep medications for you or your baby in a child’s reach. Even if your baby is not old enough to be climbing to reach medicine, it’s a good practice to start now, so you will be in the habit of doing so when the child starts crawling.

If he medication has to be refrigerated, keep it in the refrigerator. For all other medications, you can always ask your doctor about how to store them.

5. Take Care of Yourself

Even if it seems like the baby is taking up all your time (wake and sleep), you still have to find time for yourself.  To remedy not getting enough sleep, learn how to sleep when the baby is sleeping and napping. If you are experiences signs of postpartum depression and are feeling sad a lot, then consult your doctor immediately for possible solutions. Make sure to go to your six-week postpartum appointment even if you don’t have any symptoms.