High intensity exercise has quickly become a growing trend within the fitness community because it allows for more work to be performed in a shorter period of time and it helps the athlete achieve higher levels of anaerobic fitness. As our lives become busier, extended workouts or high volume training methods with multiple sets and extended rest periods are not practical for the average person due to lack of motivation, attention span or their busy lifestyle.

The more important aspect of high intensity exercise that has made it popular is the results. Research has shown that high intensity interval training (running, rowing or high repetition resistance training) improves anaerobic as well as aerobic endurance while moderate intensity endurance training can only improve aerobic endurance.

High-intensity exercises are one of the best ways to torch fat and get into shape. However, preparing your body with supplements for high-intensity exercises is just as important as actually doing the exercises.

Why do you take supplements? To fill the gaps in your diet, or to maximize the results you get from your training. But don’t forget this one: To perform better in the gym! Consistent daily use of supplements for high-intensity exercises can have several beneficial effects on power, strength, and performance!

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Think about using an over-the-counter (OTC) antacid product for upset stomach or heartburn that does not contain aspirin.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) says that if you use an aspirin-containing product for acid indigestion, upset stomach, sour stomach or heartburn, you risk the potential for having stomach or intestinal bleeding.

To date, stomach bleed cases are rare but possible. Since 2009, the FDA has warned about the potential for stomach bleeding risk when consuming aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). However, there have been reports of antacid products causing that same effect since the 2009 caution, and some people have had to get a blood transfusion.

Most people don’t consider the potential of stomach products causing more stomach problems because they don’t read the label. Therefore, when considering a product for treating a stomach ailment, always check out the Drug Facts label to see if the product contains aspirin. If it does, you may want to find another product that is friendlier to your stomach.

It’s not that the FDA does not want people to use aspirin at all. The FDA just feels it’s important consumers are educated about the risk antacid products with aspirin can have.

So, when considering which OTC antacid to take for upset stomach, all you have to do is read the Drug Facts label to see if the product has aspirin and has a warning about stomach bleeding. If the medicine contains aspirin, you still have a lot of other options out there that don’t.

Who’s at Higher Risk of Bleeding

The FDA believes antacids with aspirin influence stomach bleed episodes because aspirin acts as a blood thinner. People with risk factors for stomach bleeding are more prone to have a bleeding episode than others when using these products.

People at a higher risk for bleeding when using aspirin-containing aspirin products are people who:

  • Are age 60 or older.
  • Have a history of stomach bleeding or ulcers.
  • Take anticoagulants or blood thinners that reduce the body’s ability to form blood clots.
  • Take steroids to treat inflammation (like prednisone)
  • Take other NSAIDs (like naproxen or ibuprofen).
  • Consume three or more alcoholic drinks daily.

Signs of stomach/intestinal bleeding are abdominal pain, bloody (or black) stools, vomiting blood or feeling faint. If you experience any of these signs, get medical attention as soon as possible.

How to Settle an Upset Stomach

There are alternative treatments for soothing stomach ailments. Look for product labels that say the product is an acid reducer or antacid.

A lot of products on the market for stomach ailments only have antacids like magnesium hydroxide, calcium carbonate or some other antacid. If you suffer from frequent heartburn, you can get acid reducers like H2 blockers (ranitidine, famotidine, cimetidine) or proton pump inhibitors (esomeprazole, omeprazole or lansoprazole).

Whether you’re an amateur athlete or a weekend warrior, there are nutritional supplements for improved sports performance can help you get the most out of every workout, game, or run!

Your preference for athletics may be a few hours playing tennis or pick-up soccer games, an afternoon hike, a mud run, or even some home training. You may not be a professional athlete, but that doesn’t mean you don’t take physical fitness seriously. And that means you probably want to improve your performance, regardless of how it’s measured.

The sad truth is, most supplements don’t live up to their marketing hype. And no supplement can replace a sensible diet or hard training. But a handful of these products do provide real, scientifically proven benefits for athletes, such as faster post-exercise recovery, enhanced workout performance and reduced risk of injury.

Nutritional supplements for sports performance are suitable for:

  • Athletes of all levels from recreational to professional.
  • Those looking to enhance endurance and stamina levels.
  • Anyone seeking to gain a competitive edge in their training and on match-day.

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that heart disease is the leading cause of death for women in the United States, which means one in four women will die from heart disease in America.

There are some preventive strategies you can adopt to reduce the risk of heart disease. The FDA has recommended the following tips to assist women in reducing the risk of death from heart disease.

Tips to Reduce Your Risk

Although heart disease can cause stroke and heart attack fatalities, there are some strategies you can employ to decrease the risk.

Take care of your current health issues. Conditions like high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes all increase the potential for heart disease if you don’t discuss with your health care provider the best treatment options for these conditions.

Quit smoking. The FDA’s website has great information on medical treatments to help you stop the habit.

Exercise regularly for healthy weight maintenance. Everybody may not be a gym fan and can complete all their exercises in one set. You may have to start out by walking or doing some other activity as your doctor recommends.

Know the symptoms of a heart attack in women.  Call 911 if you feel you are having the symptoms of a heart attack: nausea, ache or tight feeling in the chest (or jaw, neck or abdomen), or shortness of breath.

A daily aspirin regimen is not for everybody. Before committing to an aspirin regimen as a heart attack preventative, consult your doctor first.

Eat healthier.  A diet rich in fruits and vegetables and limited in fats and sugars is good prescription for healthier eating. Also, include more whole grains and less prepared and packaged/processed foods. Check out the food labels to see what you are consuming in the food products you buy. You may want to discuss your dietary needs with your health care provider.

Always consult your health care provider before committing to a clinical trial for heart medications or treatments.  A clinical trial is an experimental study requiring human volunteers to test out new medicines and treatments.

Menopause and Heart Health

The decrease in estrogen that occurs during menopause can be a contributing factor for the increased risk of heart disease in women. Weight gain is another menopause factor that may also contribute. To remedy the issue of decreased estrogen, hormone therapy is often done to remedy some of the ailments of menopause.

Children are prone to having colds, but if the symptoms last for weeks on end, the problem may be another culprit: allergies.

Long-term episodes of runny (or stuffy) nose and sneezing are often signs of allergic rhinitis—the combination of symptoms that affect the nose when you have an allergic reaction to something you inhaled (or something that lands on the inside of your nose).

Allergies can be either seasonal or year-round (perennial). In most of the US, plant pollens cause the most cases of seasonal allergies (often known as hay fever). Mold, pet dander and dust mites often cause most cases of perennial allergies.

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) reports that up to 40 percent of children suffer from allergic rhinitis, and the potential for allergies is higher in children with a family history of allergies.

Although the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) allergy medicines, parents still should exercise caution when giving these medicines to their children.

Immune System Reaction

Allergies occur when our immune system responds to an allergen by releasing histamine and other chemicals that causes nose, lungs, sinus, throat, eyes, ears, skin or stomach lining symptoms.

Some children are more prone to suffer from asthma episodes (periods of wheezing or breathing difficulties) when their allergies are triggered.

Doctor for the FDA’s Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Rheumatology, Dr. Antony Durmowicz, cautions that parents treat allergies in children who have both conditions or else the asthma treatment will not be effective.

Allergy Medicines

OTC medicines are effective for treating childhood allergies. However, prescription treatments may be needed for more stubborn and persistent allergy cases. Seven options exist for pediatric allergy relief. And even if allergy medicine can be used in children as young as 6 months, you should always check the product label to determine if the medicine covers your child’s age group. Just because it’s a children’s medicine doesn’t mean it covers all age groups.

More Child-Friendly Medicines

Current pediatric legislation and FDA regulations for pharmaceutical companies promotes research and development of children’s medicines that have friendlier ingredients on the label. Since 1997, federal regulations have prompted the study of at least 600 products for minors.

Traumatic Brain Injury

April 2, 2017

Falls, football tackles, car accidents, etc. are known to cause head injuries. Anyone of any age can get a head injury that may also damage the brain.

Sudden head movements can make the brain twist in the skull and injure (or stretch) brain cells, which will alter the chemical makeup in the brain. This occurrence is known as Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI).

While children and parents are gearing up for fall school sports activities, the FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration) is studying TBI and promoting the discovery of innovative treatment options.

Symptoms and Diagnosis

Most TBI incidents happen after the head receives a jolt, blow, bump or explosive blast to the head. Sometimes, TBI comes from an existing head injury that changes brain function. Keep in mind that not all hits to the head will cause TBI. Sometimes, the occurrence is mild (like when people are somewhat disoriented); but in other instances, the damage is severe (with serious thinking and behavioral issues or change in consciousness or mental state. A concussion is a mild type of TBI.

In 2010, an estimated 2.5 million medical emergency room visits involved TBI. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)) states that almost 30% of all deaths related to injuries in the United States come from TBI.

TBI symptoms are confusion, blurred vision, headache and behavioral changes. Moderate and severe TBI are also accompanied by slurred speech, nausea or vomiting, arms or legs weakness and thinking problems. (Please refer to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke for more information concerning TBI symptoms.)

Head injuries must be diagnosed via medical examination that will entail a neurological exam. Neurological exams included an examination of a person’s motor function, thinking, coordination, reflexes and sensory function.

To date, there is no universal diagnostic standard to diagnose TBI because some forms are harder to diagnose than others. However, there are some guidelines for TBI diagnostics that are established by the American College of Rehabilitation Medicine, the CDC and other companies.

Computerized tomography scans (“CT” scans), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tests and other imaging tests are not used to diagnose TBI but can rule out other conditions from the brain injury that may be fatal (like bleeding or other conditions that may require prompt medical attention).

There are short- and long-term effects on mental abilities after having a TBI. A first-time, mild TBI may only require simple rest for a short time span. Moderate and severe cases may require therapy (occupational, physical or psychiatric) and other treatments.

Wrinkles are caused by thin, sagging skin. They particularly appear on the face, neck, backs of hands, and tops of forearms.

Wrinkles occur as part of the natural aging process, when the collagen and elastin in the connective tissue of the skin become weak and break down due to changes in fibroblasts that produce collagen and elastin.

Premature or excess wrinkles can also be caused by factors like too much exposure to sunlight or harsh environments, smoking, use of certain drugs, excessive stress, sudden weight loss, loss of vitamin E, and genetic predisposition.

There are many easy natural remedies that will help reduce wrinkles and prevent new ones from forming. Most natural wrinkle remedies do not have many side effects. You can usually try natural remedies for wrinkles without investing a lot of money or suffering from potentially serious complications.

However, it is a good idea to first consult with your dermatologist or skin care specialist, as even the best home remedies for wrinkles can have serious side effects, especially for those with sensitive skin and those prone to allergic reactions.